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in Projects, Programming, Technology

Adopting Node.js

Scott Nonnenberg wrote a great post about how Node.js is not magical.

I totally agree that Javascript is “a bit tricky.” A lot of times
people that I work with think they know javascript better than they actually do. However, I’m also noticing that it is becoming a lingua franca – more people know it.

Another good point that Scott makes: Taking the time to do tests right is hard. In my opinion writing automated tests is necessary for shipping good node code. As a developer, I try to include it in my estimate whenever possible. It’s been hard figuring out how to test all the asynchronous code, but worth it to make sure code works fully before shipping it.

If you’re just getting started with Node, see Scott’s post for some helpful links.

For me, Scott’s #3 (async by default) is the big gotcha. I just don’t think 80% of server code needs to be asynchronous. It’s not worth the complexity it adds to writing and testing your code. I always think code should be simple, not clever, and written for non-geniuses to understand. Computers are cheap, and brain power is expensive (at least for now) – so if you have a server-side function that retrieves data from a database, does a few other things, and then returns it to the client – it doesn’t need to be asynchronous to have sub 100ms response times.

Many web data services do enough I/O to benefit from the concurrency.  But, I don’t think node is the right choice for human-facing websites. I still prefer Ruby on Rails (unless your team only knows javascript).

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